DAY 4 SHANDONG TRAVEL: CULTURAL SHOW OF FENGSHAN SACRIFICES

DAY 4 SHANDONG TRAVEL: CULTURAL SHOW OF FENGSHAN SACRIFICES

 

 

MALAYSIAN HAIKU/SENRYU ECHOES 203: MIGHT VERSUS RITES

 

rites weak to protect

muscles mightier than rights

grandeur with gold wall

 

After our dine at the town of Taian city, we drove to watch this open staged cultural show in mid hills. It was dark when we reached there. The steps were dimly lighted, but it was an easy ascend. There was an auction sales on Chinese painting and calligraphy by prominent artist. The show started on time, and almost fully seated. The choreography and colourful lighting were great. There were a few hundred actors and actresses. It was about Fengshan sacrifices at Jade Peak, Mount Tai.  The story began with a grandpa telling the story of emperors and their rites on Heavenly Mandate, and ends with a note that the common folks are even better than past emperors in getting to the peak. The story line was quite boring. The audiences saw great movement of people ascended and descended the steep stage in changing scenes, with grand costumes. The wind was strong with the passing night, bringing sands with it. It was cold. Many audiences began to leave. We watched to the end, without extra fun fare.

 

 

4 thoughts on “DAY 4 SHANDONG TRAVEL: CULTURAL SHOW OF FENGSHAN SACRIFICES

  1. Claudia McGill

    It sounds like everyday life, the weather and the cold, had greater power than the staged spectacle on this occasion. Even the most grand must take heed of the eternal elements, it seemed to me your story was saying.

    Reply
    1. wonkywizard Post author

      Thank you. Though it was not a great overall show, it was a great feeling to watch an open drama in mid hills, with actors and actresses appearing from lanes in the hill.

      Reply
  2. wonkywizard Post author

    Yes, some time ago I watched another outdoor show at Mount Wu Yi, directed by the famous movie director, Mr. Chang Ying Mou. The seats moved and rotated, with rivers and hills. It was drizzling, with very cold wind. Luckily I wore my wind breaker. Those who believed in weather forecast were soaked. It was the best I saw in China.

    Reply

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